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Chicory

Chicory

Chicory is a must to any gourmet salad. We choose varieties that are easy to grow and provide great taste. Growing in popularity in home gardens but very popular at markets. Endive and Radicchio are very popular chicory options.

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How to Grow Chicory

Chicory has a long taproot that penetrates subsoils which makes it drought tolerant and allows it to make minerals more available to livestock. Rich in potassium, sulfur, calcium, zinc, sodium, manganese and iron. When managed properly, Chicory produces leafy growth which is higher in nutritive and mineral content than alfalfa and other cool season grasses. Used mainly in mixes with other pasture or cover crop seeds. Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) - Warm season, broadleaf - Perennial - Upright and spreading growth habit - Protein levels: 10-32% - Forms arbuscular mycorrhizal associations Uses: - Bees & Beneficial Insects - Chicken Forage - Deer Attractant - Forage When to Plant:Brassicas consist of short and long season brassicas. Short season brassicas (rape, turnips, radish) should be planted in mid-July or 75 days before your first frost date in the fall. Long season brassicas (kale, swede) should be planted in early May or 150 days before your first frost date in the fall.How to Plant:Till ground before planting. Then firm ground to make flat. Use a seed broadcaster to spread seed evenly over the ground. Next flatten ground again to secure seeds into soil. When to Plant: Brassicas consist of short and long season brassicas. Short season brassicas (rape, turnips, radish) should be planted in mid-July or 75 days before your first frost date in the fall. Long season brassicas (kale, swede) should be planted in early May or 150 days before your first frost date in the fall. How to Plant: Till ground before planting. Then firm ground to make flat. Use a seed broadcaster to spread seed evenly over the ground. Next flatten ground again to secure seeds into soil. Fertilizing: Add 50 lbs of nitrogen per acre and 200 lbs of 6-24-24 at planting. Location:Planting Depth:Soil Type:Full Sun1/8-1/4"Moist, loamy soil Seeding Rates: Sowing SeasonSeeding Rate (1,000 Sq. Ft.)Seeding Rate (1 Acre)ChicorySpring1/4 lb.3-4  lbs.FlaxSpring and Summer1 lb.27-40 lbs.KaleSpring1/4  lb.4 lbs.RadishLate Summer1 lb.10-20 lbs.RapeSpring & Summer1 lb.5-15 lbs.RutabagaSpring & Summer1/4 lb.3-5 lbs.TurnipSpring or Late Summer1/4 lb.8-10 lbs. Sowing SeasonSeeding Rate (1,000 Sq. Ft.)Seeding Rate (1 Acre)ChicorySpring1/4 lb.3-4  lbs.FlaxSpring and Summer1 lb.27-40 lbs.KaleSpring1/4  lb.4 lbs.RadishLate Summer1 lb.10-20 lbs.RapeSpring & Summer1 lb.5-15 lbs.RutabagaSpring & Summer1/4 lb.3-5 lbs.TurnipSpring or Late Summer1/4 lb.8-10 lbs. Cover Crop Calculator: Calculate the amount of cover crop needed Calculate the amount of cover crop needed 1 Acre = 43,560 square feet, or 435'x100' Weight Conversion: 1 Pound = 16 Ounces

The Green Curled Ruffec Endive is an old hardy endive that grows well in cold weather. This variety is a hardy grower in both cold and wet weather. The Green Curled Ruffec Endive has deep cut green leaves that are great for garnishes and salads.

The Full Heart Escarole 65 is a chicory that grows upright with delicious creamy leaves. This variety has broad smooth dark green leaves that bunch nicely. The Full Heart Escarole 65's dark green head surrounds the creamy yellow blanched centers. This chicory is great as a garnish!

The Broadleaf Batavian Endive chicory has broad lettuce like leaves with a slight twist. This endive forms leaves around 10-12" and heads that are tightly packed with a well blanched, creamy heart. The Broadleaf Batavian Endive is perfect for garnishes to any dish!

The Red Verona Radicchio chicory produces mini, red, cabbage-like heads! This variety is a great addition to any garden and can be harvested in the fall. The Red Verona Radicchio's leaves are tangy and sharp, so they should be used sparingly in green salads. They taste excellent steamed or grilled with meats.

The Tres Fine Maraichere Olesh is an old French heirloom frisée endive that is tres fine! This variety forms a heart of finely cut, frilly leaves that are mildly bitter, and deliciously crispy in gourmet salad mixes. Tie the heads closed one week before harvest to blanch the center to a creamy white color. Tres Fine Maraichere Olesh does best in spring or fall under cooler conditions.

The Frisee Endive chicory has beautiful cut leaves are a must in gourmet salads! This variety is often found in gourmet mesclun mixes. Frisee's finely cut leaves add beauty and body to any salad and lends a refined, slightly bitter pop to salads.

The Salad King Endive lives up to its name, as it is the king of salads! It is a beautiful endive with vigorous and uniform growth. This variety's long, curled and deeply cut leaves have a dark green blade and pale green midrib. The Salad King Endive grows more spreading and is very slow bolting in hot weather while withstanding fall rains and light frost as well.