Zone 7 - What to Plant in November

Zone 7 - What to Plant in November

Zone 7 growers don't have a lot of options in November. The cold weather is here to stay for a few months. Since zone 7 growers don't get extremely cold weather in the winter you can still grow some items in November. Try the below cover crops and turnips to keep your garden going.

The Barkant Forage Turnip is an improved, early maturing, diploid turnip variety with a large purple tankard shaped bulb. Turnips have a high leaf to stem ratio and and provide very high concentrations of protein, sugar content and leaf yields. This turnip is ideally suited for grazing and it is common to obtain 4-6 tons of dry matter per acre of this high-energy feed.  Uses: Chicken forage, deer attractant, forage

The Sweet Clover is a legume that is exceptional for not only attracting honey bees to the garden, but also creating green manure! This clover can grow nearly anywhere under most conditions. The Sweet Clover is our favorite clover because it is more versatile than other clovers at nitrogen fixating, erosion control and attracting beneficial insects. This variety is slow to establish the first year but comes on fast the following year and can produce up to 170 lb. of nitrogen per acre. The Sweet Clover comes OMRI Pre-inoculated. Uses: Bees & Beneficial Insects, Chicken Forage, Compaction Control, Deer Attractant, Erosion Control, Forage, Green Manure, Nitrogen Fixation, No Till, Weed Suppression

The Packer Forage Pea, or Canadian field pea, is a cool-season legume that is used for cover crops, wildlife and winter grazing! This annual legume has good nitrogen-fixing capabilities. The Packer Forage Pea is a low-growing, viny legume which has been shown to fix over 200 pounds of nitrogen per acre per year. Uses: Chicken Forage, Deer Attractant, Forage, Green Manure, Nitrogen Fixation, No Till, Organic Matter (Biomass), Weed Suppression

The German White is a certified, great hardneck storage garlic! German White garlic is a large, porcelain type garlic bulb that contains 4-5 large easy-to-peel cloves. The white skin on the German White has delicate purple stripes. This variety is one of the best garlics in taste without all the spiciness. This garlic does well in any climate! Approximately 6-8 garlic bulbs per pound. Approximately 4-5 cloves per bulb. Hardneck Garlic

A multipurpose cover crop blend that is sowed in fall! This wonderful blend will help with nitrogen fixation, adding organic matter and weed suppression. Contains a blend of Austrian Field Peas, Crimson Clover, Hairy Vetch, Annual and Winter Rye. Cut right after flowering in spring and till into soil for green manure. (30% Field Pea, 20% Crimson Clover, 20% Hairy Vetch, 15% Annual Rye, 15% Winter Rye) Seed Coverage: - 5 lbs covers 2,000-4,000 sqaure feet - 100 lbs covers 1-2 acres Uses: Green Manure, Nitrogen Fixation, No Till, Organic Matter (Biomass), Weed Suppression

Great way to fix nitrogen and add organic matter to the soil! A great mix of grass and legume cover crops. Hairy Vetch works well for nitrogen fixation while Rye adds organic matter and protects the less hardy vetch from winter damage. If planted in fall it comes back early spring with heavy growth. Cut right after it flowers and spring and till into soil. (75% Winter Rye / 25% Hairy Vetch) Seed Coverage: - 5 lbs covers 2,000-4,000 sqaure feet - 100 lbs covers 1-2 acres Uses: Deer Attractant, Green Manure, Nitrogen Fixation, No Till, Organic Matter (Biomass), Weed Suppression

The Sideoats Grama is a warm-season bunchgrass grain variety that is easy to grow and native throughout much of North America. The ornamental and distinctive seed spikes hang from only one side of the stalk, and these make good fresh or dried cuttings. This grain prefers full sun and moderate to dry soils. The Sideoats Grama is recommended for meadow and prairie plantings, beds & borders, and as a component of forage mixes for livestock and wildlife.

Chicory has a long taproot that penetrates subsoils which makes it drought tolerant and allows it to make minerals more available to livestock. Rich in potassium, sulfur, calcium, zinc, sodium, manganese and iron. When managed properly, Chicory produces leafy growth which is higher in nutritive and mineral content than alfalfa and other cool season grasses. Used mainly in mixes with other pasture or cover crop seeds. Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) - Warm season, broadleaf - Perennial - Upright and spreading growth habit - Protein levels: 10-32% - Forms arbuscular mycorrhizal associations Uses: - Bees & Beneficial Insects - Chicken Forage - Deer Attractant - Forage When to Plant:Brassicas consist of short and long season brassicas. Short season brassicas (rape, turnips, radish) should be planted in mid-July or 75 days before your first frost date in the fall. Long season brassicas (kale, swede) should be planted in early May or 150 days before your first frost date in the fall.How to Plant:Till ground before planting. Then firm ground to make flat. Use a seed broadcaster to spread seed evenly over the ground. Next flatten ground again to secure seeds into soil. When to Plant: Brassicas consist of short and long season brassicas. Short season brassicas (rape, turnips, radish) should be planted in mid-July or 75 days before your first frost date in the fall. Long season brassicas (kale, swede) should be planted in early May or 150 days before your first frost date in the fall. How to Plant: Till ground before planting. Then firm ground to make flat. Use a seed broadcaster to spread seed evenly over the ground. Next flatten ground again to secure seeds into soil. Fertilizing: Add 50 lbs of nitrogen per acre and 200 lbs of 6-24-24 at planting. Location:Planting Depth:Soil Type:Full Sun1/8-1/4"Moist, loamy soil Seeding Rates: Sowing SeasonSeeding Rate (1,000 Sq. Ft.)Seeding Rate (1 Acre)ChicorySpring1/4 lb.3-4  lbs.FlaxSpring and Summer1 lb.27-40 lbs.KaleSpring1/4  lb.4 lbs.RadishLate Summer1 lb.10-20 lbs.RapeSpring & Summer1 lb.5-15 lbs.RutabagaSpring & Summer1/4 lb.3-5 lbs.TurnipSpring or Late Summer1/4 lb.8-10 lbs. Sowing SeasonSeeding Rate (1,000 Sq. Ft.)Seeding Rate (1 Acre)ChicorySpring1/4 lb.3-4  lbs.FlaxSpring and Summer1 lb.27-40 lbs.KaleSpring1/4  lb.4 lbs.RadishLate Summer1 lb.10-20 lbs.RapeSpring & Summer1 lb.5-15 lbs.RutabagaSpring & Summer1/4 lb.3-5 lbs.TurnipSpring or Late Summer1/4 lb.8-10 lbs. Cover Crop Calculator: Calculate the amount of cover crop needed Calculate the amount of cover crop needed 1 Acre = 43,560 square feet, or 435'x100' Weight Conversion: 1 Pound = 16 Ounces

Georgian Crystal garlic has a rich flavor and mild heat for a Porcelain hardneck. When slow roasted this variety, it has an amazing buttery flavor that melts in your mouth! This garlic grows well throughout the USA, but even better in areas with hot summers. Averages 4-5 cloves per bulb.

Music garlic is a "Garlic Lovers" garlic! This garlic variety is prized for it's mild flavor and ease of peeling. Its flavor is well developed without any bitterness, and it does not disappear when cooked. Just one clove can add so much flavor to any recipe, so it is time-saving! This variety keeps well until April or May when stored properly. Most bulbs average 4-5 cloves.

The Common Flax is a cool season annual broadleaf with small taproots and very small, narrow leaves that are less than an inch long. This variety's stems are branched near the base of the plant, with plants reaching 30 to 36 inches in height. The multiple stems or branches of a flax plant are slender and flexible, bearing attractive blue flowers. Flax has the same performance benefits of other grasses and grains, of quick germination and a highly fibrous root mass. Flax will take up excess N and other minerals, will winter kill and provide moderate to high amounts of organic matter back to the soil. Flax provides excellent mulch for protection of erosion and improving water permeation during the winter and spring. Flax (Linum usitatissimum): Cool season, broadleaf, Annual, Upright plant habit Uses: Bees & Beneficial Insects, Chicken Forage, Erosion Control, Green Manure, Nitrogen Savenger, No Till, Organic Matter (Biomass)

The Indiangrass is a warm-season bunchgrass that is native to central and eastern North America and provides cover and food for wildlife. This grass can reach up to seven feet tall and is a common species of the Tallgrass Prairie. The beautiful, plume-like seed heads are very ornamental making them excellent for prairie and conservation mixtures.

Romanian Red garlic produces 4 to 5 large cloves per bulb. This variety's bulbs are a beautiful cream white with shades of purple skins. Once harvested, these whole bulbs will store for months. Romanian Red produces a delicious flavor that is pungent and long-lasting.

The German Extra Hardy garlic is a prolific producer of long rooted garlic that can store in the ground throughout winter. This variety has pale white skin with dark red cloves. The German Extra Hardy has a strong raw flavor and high sugar content, making it one of the very best for roasting. Hardneck, 4-7 cloves per bulb.

The Buffalo Grass is a warm-season grass that is the predominant component of the shortgrass prairies of the Great Plains. Once established, it is extremely drought tolerant and tough. It can be used as a xeriscape lawn grass for water conservation, and it is a common component in range mixtures. White Tailed Deer, Bison and Prairie Dogs utilize it for forage, and it is a larval host for the Green Skipper. Plants are stoloniferous and can invade flower beds if an edging or barrier is not used.

Elephant is certified and the largest "garlic" you can get! This variety of "garlic" looks like garlic and tastes like a mild hardneck type, but it is actually a type of leek. Just like its name, Elephant is large with 1 1/2" cloves that have a great mild garlic-like flavor. Elephant's bulbs can easily weigh a pound or more! This variety is very easy peeling and keeps very well. Each bulb averages 3-5 cloves. Approximately 9-14 garlic cloves per pound. Hardneck Garlic

California Early is an excellent planting garlic variety that produces bulbs great for culinary use and is an early season garlic harvest! This variety is likely the most commonly grown variety in the U.S., and for good reason. It is a medium, easy to grow softneck, with a nice mild flavor and excellent storage ability. Cal-Early is one of our "work-horse" varieties we depend on, year after year, for fresh market and garlic braiding. The skins are a nice off-white with a purple blush and it produces 10-16 cloves per head.

Georgian Fire garlic is a certified, farm favorite with a stunning flavor and cloves! This garlic variety has the classic garlic porcelain sheen and flavor. The Georgian Fire variety is the beauty queen of the garlic world. Its cloves grow large and average about 6 to 8 per bulb. This garlic can be eaten raw as they have a pleasantly hot flavor. Roasting really brings out the flavor of Georgian Fire! Porcelain hardneck type. Approximately 10 garlic bulbs per pound.