Mammoth Long Island, Dill Seed

Dill

Out of Stock

Mammoth Long Island, Dill Seed

Dill

The Mammoth Long Island Dill is an attractive, tall, large-sized dill variety that has a lovely, tangy aroma that is perfect as a pickling spice. The leaves, immature flower tops and mature seeds are all used as an essential pickling spice. This easy-to-grow productive herb will reseed itself if allowed. As a companion plant, the Mammoth Long Island Dill can enhance the growth of cabbages, onions, lettuce and tomatoes.
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Product Details

Botanical Name

Anethum graveolens

Seed Type

Seed

Seeds Per Gram

604

Seeds Per Pound

270,400

Packet

250 seeds

Sow Depth

1/4"

Seeds Per Ounce

16900

Breed

Open-pollinated

Growing Conditions

Container

Life Cycle

Annual

Sow Method

Direct SowTransplant

Categories

Herb

Zones

3,4,5,6,7,8,9

Germination

11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,7,8,9,20,10,21

Days To Maturity (# Days)

60

Weight

0.008

Depth

0.1

Height

4.5

Width

3.25

Components

Growing Instructions

Learning Download: How to Grow Dill

Dill is a fern-like, fragrant plant with a great flavor. In addition to its fragrant foliage, dill also produces yellow
blooms that can be used in bouquets, or the green ferns can be used as filler. Dill can reach up to 3 feet tall.

Before Planting: Dill grows best sown directly into the garden in the early spring after the last frost. To ensure a continuous harvest, plant dill seeds every 10 days up until the early summer. Dill also can be planted in containers, like most herbs, but a deep pot should be used to accommodate for the herb’s deep roots.

Planting: Plant seeds ¼ inch deep and 18 inches apart.

Watering: Water regularly. Be careful not to over-water and allow the soil to go dry between watering

Fertilizer: Similar to most herbs dill does not require fertilizing to grow. In the late spring, a light feeding of a 5-10-5 fertilizer will encourage the dill to grow without being overbearing. If dill is grown in a container, use a liquid fertilizer but only use half of the label’s recommended strength. Fertilize container dill every four to six weeks.

Days to Maturity: Dill is ready to harvest any time before its yellow, umbrella-like flowers begin to open. (See each variety for days to maturity)

Harvesting: Once dill is ready to harvest, you can snip individual stems or pull up the entire plant. To save the dill seeds, cut the dill four inches below the flower head once seeds begin to turn brown. Hang the clippings upside
down in paper bags to catch the seeds as they dry and fall out.

Tips: Since dill can grow so tall, shelter it from wind or add a stake to the stem to support the plant as it grows higher.

Shipping Schedule

Our Seed Promise

"Agriculture and seeds" provide the basis upon which our lives depend. We must protect this foundation as a safe and genetically stable source for future generations. For the benefit of all farmers, gardeners and consumers who want an alternative, we pledge that we do not knowingly buy or sell genetically engineered seeds or plants.

The mechanical transfer of genetic material outside of natural reproductive methods and between genera, families or kingdoms, poses great biological risks as well as economic, political, and cultural threats. We feel that genetically engineered varieties have been insufficiently tested prior to public release. More research and testing is necessary to further assess the potential risks of genetically engineered seeds. Further, we wish to support agricultural progress that leads to healthier soils, to genetically diverse agricultural ecosystems, and ultimately to healthy people and communities.

To learn more about the "Safe Seed Pledge" please visit www.councilforresponsiblegenetics.org.