Bees And Beneficial Insects

Bees and Beneficial Insects Seed

Attracting bees to your farm or garden is one of the most beneficial things you can do. Bees help increase vegetable yields and health of plants. If you can't have a bee hive on your property the next best thing is bee attracting plants.

The Sweet Clover is a legume that is exceptional for not only attracting honey bees to the garden, but also creating green manure! This clover can grow nearly anywhere under most conditions. The Sweet Clover is our favorite clover because it is more versatile than other clovers at nitrogen fixating, erosion control and attracting beneficial insects. This variety is slow to establish the first year but comes on fast the following year and can produce up to 170 lb. of nitrogen per acre. The Sweet Clover comes OMRI Pre-inoculated. Uses: Bees & Beneficial Insects, Chicken Forage, Compaction Control, Deer Attractant, Erosion Control, Forage, Green Manure, Nitrogen Fixation, No Till, Weed Suppression

The California Blackeye #46 is similar to California Blackeye #5, but with smaller seeds. Bred by the UCLA and released in 1987. California Blackeye #46 plants are more erect than California Blackeye #5. The seeds are a typical blackeye type of Southern peas with cream-colored seed coats and black pigments around the eyes.  Heavy yielder. If using for Nitrogen fixation we highly recommend using a cowpea inoculant. Try with cowpea inoculant for maximum Nitrogen fixation.

The Texas Cream is a heavy yielding Southern cowpea that is great for fresh shelling. This variety is very similarly to 'Sadandy' but the cowpeas are slightly larger. These bush-type plants are prolific and thrive in hotter, Southern weather. Texas Cream is a "cream pea" type variety, they are generally used at the fresh shelling stage. If you are using for Nitrogen fixation we highly recommend using a cowpea inoculant. Try with cowpea inoculant for maximum Nitrogen fixation.

Chicory has a long taproot that penetrates subsoils which makes it drought tolerant and allows it to make minerals more available to livestock. Rich in potassium, sulfur, calcium, zinc, sodium, manganese and iron. When managed properly, Chicory produces leafy growth which is higher in nutritive and mineral content than alfalfa and other cool season grasses. Used mainly in mixes with other pasture or cover crop seeds. Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) - Warm season, broadleaf - Perennial - Upright and spreading growth habit - Protein levels: 10-32% - Forms arbuscular mycorrhizal associations Uses: - Bees & Beneficial Insects - Chicken Forage - Deer Attractant - Forage When to Plant:Brassicas consist of short and long season brassicas. Short season brassicas (rape, turnips, radish) should be planted in mid-July or 75 days before your first frost date in the fall. Long season brassicas (kale, swede) should be planted in early May or 150 days before your first frost date in the fall.How to Plant:Till ground before planting. Then firm ground to make flat. Use a seed broadcaster to spread seed evenly over the ground. Next flatten ground again to secure seeds into soil. When to Plant: Brassicas consist of short and long season brassicas. Short season brassicas (rape, turnips, radish) should be planted in mid-July or 75 days before your first frost date in the fall. Long season brassicas (kale, swede) should be planted in early May or 150 days before your first frost date in the fall. How to Plant: Till ground before planting. Then firm ground to make flat. Use a seed broadcaster to spread seed evenly over the ground. Next flatten ground again to secure seeds into soil. Fertilizing: Add 50 lbs of nitrogen per acre and 200 lbs of 6-24-24 at planting. Location:Planting Depth:Soil Type:Full Sun1/8-1/4"Moist, loamy soil Seeding Rates: Sowing SeasonSeeding Rate (1,000 Sq. Ft.)Seeding Rate (1 Acre)ChicorySpring1/4 lb.3-4  lbs.FlaxSpring and Summer1 lb.27-40 lbs.KaleSpring1/4  lb.4 lbs.RadishLate Summer1 lb.10-20 lbs.RapeSpring & Summer1 lb.5-15 lbs.RutabagaSpring & Summer1/4 lb.3-5 lbs.TurnipSpring or Late Summer1/4 lb.8-10 lbs. Sowing SeasonSeeding Rate (1,000 Sq. Ft.)Seeding Rate (1 Acre)ChicorySpring1/4 lb.3-4  lbs.FlaxSpring and Summer1 lb.27-40 lbs.KaleSpring1/4  lb.4 lbs.RadishLate Summer1 lb.10-20 lbs.RapeSpring & Summer1 lb.5-15 lbs.RutabagaSpring & Summer1/4 lb.3-5 lbs.TurnipSpring or Late Summer1/4 lb.8-10 lbs. Cover Crop Calculator: Calculate the amount of cover crop needed Calculate the amount of cover crop needed 1 Acre = 43,560 square feet, or 435'x100' Weight Conversion: 1 Pound = 16 Ounces

The Common Buckwheat is a grain that can be planted late spring to early summer and improves top soil and an effective choke weed! This variety establishes quickly and matures in 60 days. This buckwheat accumulates phosphorus and and potassium for following crops and is frost sensitive. Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench): Cool Season, Grain, Annual, Upright growth habit, Enhances soil P availability,Crude protein: straw 5%, grain 13% Uses: Bees & Beneficial Insects, Green Manure, No Till, Organic Matter (Biomass), Weed Suppresion

The Common Flax is a cool season annual broadleaf with small taproots and very small, narrow leaves that are less than an inch long. This variety's stems are branched near the base of the plant, with plants reaching 30 to 36 inches in height. The multiple stems or branches of a flax plant are slender and flexible, bearing attractive blue flowers. Flax has the same performance benefits of other grasses and grains, of quick germination and a highly fibrous root mass. Flax will take up excess N and other minerals, will winter kill and provide moderate to high amounts of organic matter back to the soil. Flax provides excellent mulch for protection of erosion and improving water permeation during the winter and spring. Flax (Linum usitatissimum): Cool season, broadleaf, Annual, Upright plant habit Uses: Bees & Beneficial Insects, Chicken Forage, Erosion Control, Green Manure, Nitrogen Savenger, No Till, Organic Matter (Biomass)

The Thoroughbred Barley is a widely adapted variety of barley that is high yielding, with a great straw strength and a high test weight. This grain is a good standing six-rowed barley. This variety is resistant to powdery mildew and barley yellow dwarf virus. Uses: Bees & Beneficial Insects, Erosion Control, Green Manure, Nitrogen Scavenger, No Till, Organic Matter (Biomass), Weed Suppression

The California Blackeye #5 cowpea is high yielding, vigorous and easy to grow. You can use these as green shell peas or dry like winter beans. Try with cowpea inoculant for maximum Nitrogen fixation.

The White Dutch Clover is a perennial clover variety that is a customer favorite for controlling erosion while protecting the soil! This legume is a living mulch of permanent cover that spreads by stolons. Grow low so takes close mowing and grazing. The White Dutch Clover benefits bees and insects as well as fixes nitrogen. Uses: Bees & Beneficial Insects, Chicken Forage, Deer Attractant, Erosion Control, Forage, Green Manure, Nitrogen Fixation, No Till, Weed Suppression

The Mississippi Silver cowpea is adapted to hot humid climates, but does well in most climates. This variety produces pods 6-7 " long, and that are colored silver, occasionally streaked with rose. The Mississippi Silver is easy to grow and shell. If you are using for Nitrogen fixation we highly recommend using a cowpea inoculant. Try with cowpea inoculant for maximum Nitrogen fixation.

The Knuckle Purple Hull is a bush type cowpea producing heavy yields of purple pods. Cowpeas in general are great for drying and canning. This variety tends to stay off the ground and cluster making for easy picking. This cowpea is referred to as a "Knuckle Hull" because of the big, plump cowpeas. Try with cowpea inoculant for maximum Nitrogen fixation.

Iron and Clay cowpeas makes a great cover crop for smothering weeds and adding Nitrogen to soil. This variety of cowpeas are grown just like soybeans. Iron and Clay is a fast growing plant that can reach 3'. The best time to plant is during spring for best results as the frost will kill the cowpeas. Iron and Clay has long taproots that help withstand drought conditions and can produce as much as 300 lb./acre nitrogen. This variety has a high organic matter production. Broadcast up to 120 lb./acre, 1/2 to 1" deep. Try with cowpea inoculant for maximum Nitrogen fixation.